Rediscovering Limerick #6 – A Trip into Limericks Past

A Trip into Limericks Past

A Trip into Limericks Past – Rediscovering Limerick #6 

Take a trip into Limericks past with I Love Limerick and Limerick’s Life.

Here at I Love Limerick we are proud to present the sixth episode of our web series that delves into the fascinating historical past of Limerick and its people. ‘Rediscovering Limerick’ is a collaboration between Limerick’s Life and I Love Limerick that will help you uncover the many tales that truly define Limerick as a city. 

This week, Limerick historian Sharon Slater takes a trip into Limericks past looking at one of Limerick’s world record breakers, a historical innovator and stories behind some impressive buildings which we walk past on a daily basis. 

A Trip into Limericks Past

Saint Mary’s Cathedral, Limerick, is a cathedral of the Church of Ireland in Limerick, Ireland, which is dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary.

This includes some of those who sourced the building materials, the “Sandcot Men”, who plied their trade along with the Abbey and Shannon Rivers for generations. The sand cots can be seen unloading their sand which was dredged at Plassy. The sand cots were then towed by manpower from the head of the canal and their contents sold for two shillings a horseload delivered.

We visit one of the oldest graveyards in the city at St. Mary’s Cathedral as well as Mount Saint Lawrence, and speak about a few of the eternal residents. The cathedral grounds holds United Nations Memorial Plaque with the names of all the Irish men who died while serving in the United Nations Peacekeepers. The physician Samuel Crumpe, Prince Milo of Montenegro, the first female mayor of Limerick Frances Condell and Bishop Charles Graves are also interred in the grounds.

The last High King of Munster, Domnall was purportedly buried in the Cathedral, with the remnants of his stone coffin still visible in the Cathedral chancel. Bishop Cornelius O’Dea is buried alongside several other Bishops of Limerick in what is believed to be an Episcopal vault underneath the chancel itself. Also notable are the Sexton, Barrington, Boyd and Vanderkiste tombs along the south entrance pathway.

Additionally, in this video, we discover a hidden gem, a Prince. Make sure to watch and find out!

Rediscovering Limerick is researched, written and presented by Sharon Slater of Limerick’s Life

For more information about Limerick’s Life, click here.

For more Rediscovering Limerick episodes, click here.

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